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Cadets learn to use weapons:

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By STAFF SGT. SHEJAL PULIVARTI

Task Force Wolf

The hand grenade is a hand-held, hand-armed, and hand-thrown weapon. There are six types of grenades and the U.S. Army uses each grenade with its different capability to provide Soldiers a variety of options to successfully complete the mission.

The Hand Grenade Assault Course committee, assigned to Task Force Wolf, is comprised of Reserve Soldiers from Company A, 2nd Battalion, 399th Regiment, 1st Brigade, 104th Training Division (Leader Training), who coach and evaluate cadets attending Cadet Summer Training at Fort Knox, in proper hand grenade skills. The HGAC teaches cadets to use proper preparation, correct form in different body positions, individual movement techniques, and various engage-ment usage skills.

“The cadets learn four basic engagement techniques for assaulting with hand grenades: knock out a bunker technique, prone-to-kneeling technique—used when there is very little ground cover—kneeling technique—used when there is medium height ground cover, and a standing engagement technique,” said Sgt. 1st Class Brian Bacon, instructor noncommissioned officer in charge, HGAC committee, Task Force Wolf.

The hands-on experience the course provides the cadets is beneficial to their tactical proficiency at the skills.

“This training is very important, this gives the cadets the experience they should expect in a combat situation,” said Sgt. 1st Class Frank Beman, evaluator.

The cadre teaches the techniques at five stations and then assesses the cadets’ skills on the assault course, which incorporates all the skills.

“My role as cadre and training the cadets is extremely important. We have to ensure they learn all the techniques and skills correctly and proficiently,” said Sgt. 1st Class Harry Bowles, evaluator, HGAC committee.

A fellow cadre member echoed the sentiments.

“I love this being a part of this training. I love the motivation, and more importantly, I love being able to mentor the cadets,” said Beman.