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Opinion

  • The recently announced decision, outlined in the Turret, to install new screening devices and procedures at all the entry gates at Fort Knox, could only have been conceived by someone with no experience at entering this installation during peak traffic times.

    These new procedures will greatly endanger the communting members of this community as they come to work during the early morning hours.

  • Editor’s note: The following editorial, among the most famous ever written, appeared in the New York Sun in 1897 and remains appropriate for the holiday season 112 years later.

    Dear Editor:

    I am 8 years old.

    Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus.

    Papa says, “If you see it in The Sun, it’s so.”

    Please tell me the truth: Is there a Santa Claus?

    Virginia O’Hanlon

    115 West Ninety-Fifth Street

    Virginia, your little friends are wrong.

  • By MAJ. GEN. JAMES MILANO

    Fort Knox Commander

    This time of year is often marked by snowmen, Christmas trees, Menorahs, wreaths, and holiday cheer. While it’s still three weeks until Christmas, or as my niece tells me, 21 days until she gets to open her presents on Christmas Eve, it’s a good time to solidify what we’ll be doing and where we’ll be going throughout this holiday season.

  • By JACEY ECKHART

    CinCHouse.com

    MEMO

    TO: Darling Person Who is Planning a Program, Briefing, Get Together, Coffee, Party, Class, Workshop, Event Of Any Kind for Military Spouses:

    FROM: Generation Me

  • By MAUREEN ROSE

    Turret Associate Editor

    maureen.rose@us.army.mil

    Recently, the National Fire Protection Association issued a press release discouraging the use of deep fryers to cook Thanksgiving turkeys.

    It recommends using alternate cooking methods or searching for a “professional” to do the frying for you.

  • By MAJ. GEN. JAMES MILANO

    Fort Knox Commander

    Tragically, every year children and adults are injured or killed by firearms because the necessary safety precautions weren’t heeded.

    From 1999 to 2005, 175 on-the-job accidental gunshot wounds were recorded in the U.S., and 26 of them were military.

  • In appreciation of the German Memorial Ceremony held in the Post Cemetery Nov. 17, I’ve written the following:

    When in gratitude we stand living strong—souls humbly bend. You did not know the souls that died yet you let us honor them with pride. You give path to human yearning. Friend or Foe, need or discerning. You help break barriers of the human race, bestowing peace to their resting place no matter where on earth he lies you help, remembering love, not battlecries.

    I.M. Stallings

    Vine Grove

  • By MARCIE BIRK

    Health Systems Specialist

    U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine

    Smoking impacts many parts of the body, including heart, lungs, skin, mouth and eyes. Increasingly, evidence points to a link between smoking and impotence.

    Impotence, also called erectile dysfunction, is the inability of a man to maintain an erection for sexual purposes. A study conducted in 2000 of 7,684 Chinese men (average age 47) found the following:

  • Each November, Americans gather with family and friends to give thanks for the many blessings they enjoy as citizens of this great land. This Thanksgiving Day will be particularly poignant for the many thousands of Soldiers serving in harm’s way and their Families. As you celebrate in gratitude, let us recognize the selfless service and sacrifice of our war-fighters ensuring our security and freedom.

  • By MARCIE BIRK

    Health System Specialist

    U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine

    Are you a tobacco user? Are you tired of wasting money on cigarettes? Are you worried about what cigarette smoke is doing to your health or the health of your children?

    Are you ready to quit?

    Then today’s Great American Smokeout is for you!

    Every November, you and thousands of other Americans can say goodbye to tobacco during the nation’s biggest freedom-from-tobacco event.

  • By MAJ. GEN. JAMES MILANO

    Fort Knox Commander

    During November, Americans annually remember to give thanks.

    We’ll celebrate Thanksgiving next week, and this year I ask that you remember to thank our military Families. November is Military Family Appreciation month, an appropriate time to thank our Family members for the steadfast support and sacrifice they provide to us as Soldiers.

  • Reaching out to those in need, providing relief for Soldiers and their Families, and helping the Fort Knox community is what Helping Hands is all about.

    No military Family should lack basic needs such as food and clothing. The American Red Cross provides food, clothing, items of furniture, diapers, and other items through Helping Hands, located on Chaffee Avenue.

    Director Meg Hair oversees operations at Helping Hands, including the massive distribution of Thanksgiving food items to 250 Families in need on post.

  • By JACEY ECKHART

    CinCHouse.com

    I can’t go to the commissary without reading 39 signs urging me to GET HELP!!! No one is lining up to help me tug all these grocer-ies into the house. Every-one is busy being frantic that because I am a military spouse, I clearly need help of the behavioral health variety.

    In my case, this is probably true. Even though my husband isn’t deployed, I still have the same dealio as most military spouses. I’m stressed out.

  • We are retired military. We lost most of our home due to a serious plumbing leak the week before Easter this year and have been living in it while it has been reconstructed during these past six months.

    On Oct. 30, I drove an hour and 45 minutes to Fort Knox to resupply our very empty home.

  • By MAJ. GEN. JAMES MILANO

    Fort Knox Commander

    Our thoughts and prayers are with the Fort Hood community.

     When a fellow Soldier fatally shot 13 people and wounded 30 others on  that huge Texas post last week, we felt the pain across the Army. The tragedy hit hard on Fort Knox and in our surrounding communities. It reminded us of our vulnerabilities.

  • By JACEY ECKHART

    CinCHouse.com

    I run out of local friends the way I run out of eggs. I think I’ve got plenty until I’m making a cake/having a crisis/wanna go to lunch at a place with a waitress. Then I discover that my usual friends have moved or aged-out of the bus stop or made a deployment buddy I cannot budge.

  • The holiday season is upon us, and while many of us will be home celebrating with family and friends there will be some consummate professionals at Fort Knox who will be on the job going through their normal day-to-day grind.

    That is what prompted me to write this, not as a union official but as a person who is appreciative of the selfless service that these people

    provide to the Fort Knox community.

  • By MAUREEN ROSE

    Turret Associate Editor

    maureen.rose@us.army.mil

    I interviewed a young NCO several months ago. He was the first Soldier I had met who served as a Sentinel at the Tomb of the Unknowns. However, I had heard of the legendary service that these Soldiers perform, ceaselessly standing watch over the nation’s fallen and, in particular, those who could not be identified.

  • By MAJ. GEN. JAMES MILANO

    Fort Knox Commander

    Wednesday we’ll celebrate Veterans Day.

    On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, an armistice was announced between Allied forces and Germany during World War I. For that reason, Nov. 11 was initially known as Armistice Day, primarily a day set aside to honor veterans of World War I. But in 1954, after World War II and the Korean War, Congress amended the act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting in its place the word “Veterans.”

  • I am pleased to announce that AUSA’s Institute of Land Warfare has teamed up with NCONET to capture and produce an anthology of “personal perspectives” from NCOs regarding their experiences since 9/11.

    The essays will be published and made available as a legacy for our NCOs.

    This project is part of the Year of the NCO initiative.

    The goal is to gather 1,000 essays by Dec. 31. In this way, we celebrate our NCO Corp’s experience and document our history in the war on terrorism since 9/11.