.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • By COL. JEFFREY BAILEY, M.D.

    Center for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills

    Combat veterans, now equipped with better body armor and armored vehicles, are surviving injuries that were once fatal, but are often returning from war zones with brain injuries.

    For those who are shown a conventional image of their brain that reveals no damage, it can be extremely frustrating that science cannot demonstrate what those Soldiers know—that they suffer from cognitive impairment.

  • By CAPT. MARTISSE DETTMER

    Magistrate Court Prosecutor

    Fort Knox Staff Judge Advocate Office

    SAUSA?

    What exactly is SAUSA?

    It isn’t a new version of the dance called “salsa.” Rather it’s a Special Assistant United States Attorney. Basically, a SAUSA is an active duty Army captain who prosecutes civilian felony, misdemeanor, and traffic violation cases that occur on Fort Knox, a federal enclave in the Western District of Kentucky.

  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Fall back Nov. 7.

    Benjamin Franklin is credited with the concept of Daylight Saving Time. The basic idea is to make the best use of daylight hours by shifting the clock forward in the spring and backward in the fall.

    Daylight Saving Time has been in use throughout much of the United States, Canada, and Europe since World War I. In 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed an act into law whereby Daylight Saving Time begins on the last Sunday of April and ends on the last Sunday of October each year.

  • By LARRY BARNES

    Turret Editor

    larry.barnes2@us.army.mil

    “Excuse me, sir. I’m taking an informal poll concerning Tuesday’s election. What are your thoughts?

    “If I was a campaign manager, I would urge my candidate to offer larger rewards for slander research.”

    “Larger rewards for...?”

  • By JACEY ECKHART

    CinCHouse.com

    Sue Diaz watched her student Ernie take the microphone to read his story.

    “All these memories had been neatly boxed up and compartmentalized into a safe little area in the back of his mind,” read Ernie, a Vietnam vet. “But as the years progressed, the box began to deteriorate and the recollections that he harbored began to seep through the façade.”

  • By JACEY ECKHART

    CinCHouse.com

    “Thank God for Dead Soldiers.” “God Hates Your Feelings.” “Fag Troops.”

    Would you believe these are the kinds of signs carried by members of the Westboro Baptist Church at military funerals all over the country? Would you believe these are the signs these church members carried outside the Supreme Court two weeks ago as the justices reviewed their case as a free speech issue?

  • By LARRY BARNES

    Turret Editor

    larry.barnes2@us.army.mil

    It’s around 6 p.m. on Halloween. Waldo Gypp, the owner of the neighborhood novelty store, is about to close his shop for the evening.

    Sud-denly, a man and a small boy burst through the front door. The boy is screaming.

    “Aha!” exclaims Waldo. “I’ll bet this young man wants a nice Halloween mask.”

  • At the Fort Knox, Hardin County Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans celebration, veterans stopped by our booth and filled out an index card. They were informed that we were trying to form a Chapter of Vietnam Veterans of America in the Knox area. We had 76 Vietnam-era vets sign up.

    Our first meeting will take place Oct. 31 at Nolin Rural Electric Hall, 411 Ring Road in Elizabethtown from 2- 5 p.m.

    Bring a copy of your 214 or discharge papers. Dues are $20 per year, and payment is due when you fill out a membership form.

  • By JOHN EMARY

    Employee Assistance Program

    What is Red Ribbon Week? It’s an opportunity for the Fort Knox community to unite and take a more visible stand against substance abuse.

    We can take this annual opportunity to raise public awareness, wear red ribbons, and speak up against alcohol, illegal drug use, and tobacco.

  • By DAVID KUHNS SR.

    Northwest Guardian

    Domestic abuse is like toxic mold—it thrives in hidden, dark corners, but dies when exposed to open air.

    This used to be a hidden crime, if it was taken seriously at all—either viewed as a normal part of family life, or as too shameful to be mentioned publicly. Many people even thought domestic violence was funny—any of you remember Ralph Kramden, on the old “Honeymooners” TV show raising his fist and promising, “One day Alice—pow—right in the kisser?”

  • By MAUREEN ROSE

    Turret Associate Editor

    maureen.rose@us.army.mil

    As I often do when an interview with an individual has been scheduled, I read the advance biography and resume of Buddy Bucha so I wouldn’t sound like a total idiot and, hopefully, could ask intelligent questions.

  •   The Turret staff can be proud of its long history of providing its readers a quality weekly newspaper.

    I have kept abreast of its reporting since my first arrival for assignment at Fort Knox in July 1973.

      The thrust of this letter is to bring to the forefront the question, “What’s In A Name?”  I refer of course to the title of the Fort Knox newspaper, the Turret.  We know that the important word “turret” relates to the U.S. Army Armor Branch in the form of an integral composite element of a tank.

  • By JERRY HARBEN

    Army Medicine

    The Army marks National Depression Awareness Month in October, with a theme of “Depression is Treatable—Get Screened—Seek Care.”

    Clinical depression is a serious medical condition that, if left untreated, may lead to other complicated medical conditions. Seeking treatment for a medical condition is not a sign of weakness. It may prevent a good Soldier from becoming a casualty.

  • By LT. GEN.

    RICKY LYNCH

    IMCOM commander

  • By JOHN EMARY

    Fort Knox Employee Assistance Program

    Drug-Free Work Week is a dedicated time each year to highlight the benefits that drug-free workplace programs bring to employers, workers, and communities.

    Your Fort Knox Army Substance Abuse Program is highlighting this national awareness campaign. Join us to work toward making not only this week a drug- free work week, but every week a drug-free work week.

    The Drug-Free Work Week campaign is designed to spread the word that working drug free promotes:

  • By JACEY ECKHART

    CinCHouse.com

    Did you get one of those spouse questionnaires about whether gays should serve in the military?

    I did not.

  • Fort Knox American Red  Cross

    When the Pilgrims first set foot on the new continent in 1620, they were shown how to raise crops by the native Indians. Because of that demonstrated kindness, the Pilgrims were able to celebrate the first Thanksgiving in 1621, one year after they landed in Plymouth, Mass.

  • By LT. GEN BENJAMIN FREAKLEY

    Fort Knox Commander

    On Sept. 17, 1968, Public Law 90-498 authorized the President a week in September as National Hispanic Heritage Week.  The resolution called upon the people of the United States to observe the week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

    On Aug. 17, 1988, Public Law 100-402 amended Public Law 90-498, changing National Hispanic Heritage Week to National Hispanic Heritage Month from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15.

  • By SHARI LOPATIN

    homefrontonline.com

    I could have been a statistic. Without a choice. Without a say.

    But thanks to my mother’s decision to quit smoking as I began growing in her womb, I’m not.

    Instead, at 28 years old, I get to tell the world why quitting smoking is not always just a personal choice—it’s a lifesaving choice for someone else. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that on average, about 49,000 people die from secondhand smoke in the United States each year.