.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • By STACEY ABLER

    Homefrontonline.com

    My husband was deployed overseas as I sat in the dermatologist office waiting for my bi-annual skin cancer screening to end.

    I was not prepared for how that visit ended.

    “I think this may be basal cell carcinoma,” the dermatologist said.

    My mind was a million miles away. The fact that basal cell carcinoma is skin cancer didn’t fully click until I returned home. It was then I freaked out. For the next agonizing 48 hours, I waited for the phone to ring with news of my results.

  • By STACEY ABLER

    homefrontonline.com

    As a new military wife, Shauna happened to be on post during Retreat.

    As the cannon fired, she was sure the post was under attack. She rushed back to her friend’s home to instruct her to take cover. The other wives stifled their laughter and told her to relax. Then they filled her in on protocol during Reveille and Retreat on post.

  • BY NAVY ADM. MIKE MULLEN

    Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

    Time is running out for those who qualify to receive their Stop Loss Special Pay. The deadline to claim it is Oct. 21, but less than half of the more than 145,000 people eligible have submitted claims.

    It’s not a scam. And it’s not a joke. It’s YOUR money, so come get it.

    Just in case you had forgotten, the 2009 War Supplemental Appropriations Act authorized retroactive stop loss special pay of $500 for every month or partial month served in stop loss status.

  • Department of Veterans Affairs

    Mortgage loans guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs continue to have the lowest rate for serious delinquency and foreclosures in the industry.

  • By LT. GEN. BENJAMIN FREAKLEY

    Fort Knox commander

    September is Suicide Prevention Month. It is not the only month we pay attention to the issue, but it is the month that highlights what we’ve learned and what we need to do in the future.

    When we lose a Soldier, family member, or civilian to suicide, we lose a vital part of our team for whom we all grieve.

  • By JACEY ECKHART

    CinCHouse.com

    My 8-year-old came up sputtering.

    “I have an announcement,” Pete said, struggling to his feet. “Always pay attention. Otherwise, the waves can knock you down.”

    Mr. Life Lessons had been making these “announcements”

    all day long. Although we made half a dozen trips to Delaware and Virginia beaches this year, Pete had zero interest in actually getting in the ocean. Pete is little. Waves are scary.

  • Citizens and Soldiers of Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Radcliff, Vine Grove, and West Point:

    On behalf of all the Vietnam veterans who attended the incredible “Heartland Salute to Vietnam Veterans” held in your communities Aug. 26-29, we extend sincerest thanks. Your patriotism at each event uplifted and energized us.

    We felt humbled by your recognition of our past military service, yet full of gratitude to you for removing the blanket of shame that enshrouded us for so long.

  • I read the letter from Chief Warrant Officer 2 Bill Michitsch in the Sept. 2 Turret. What a lovely heartfelt sentiment! As I read his letter it brought tears to my eyes.

    I am the wife of a Vietnam/Thailand veteran. We must never forget that right on the border of Vietnam was the U.S. Air Force, protecting those perimeters so our pilots could get out and run their bombing missions

    We must remember that the men and women who worked those bases, were as much in harm’s way as those fighting right in the midst.

  • By JACEY ECKHART

    CinCHouse.com

    The phenomenon of Geographic Bachelors—those guys who move to their new duty station and leave their families behind—has always puzzled me. Now that Brad and I are going the GeoBach route during the next year, I’m more curious than ever.

    Because there is no way that this is easier for families. It can’t possibly be costing the military less money. So where is the research? Where are the numbers? Why isn’t GeoBach one of those military social problems under intense scrutiny?

  • By MAUREEN ROSE

    Turret Associate Editor

    maureen.rose@us.army.mil

    Watching Soldiers carry the coffin of a warrior who has been killed in action is a tough story to cover.  Seeing a uniformed brother struggle to maintain his professional composure as he renders a salute, then follows the coffin to its destination, makes my throat tighten with emotion. Hearing the sobs of a bereaved mother starts the tears down my own face.

  • We thank Lt. Gen. Benjamin Freakley, Col. Rick Schwartz, our brave Fort Knox men and women in uniform, as well as everybody in Hardin County, Louisville, and Southern Indiana who contributed to the wonderful event of Aug. 26, “Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans.”

    The ceremony was outstanding and very heartwarming.

    Also, thanks to the Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation for the time and effort its personnel put in to provide such good food.

    Thank you all from the bottom of our heart!

    Barbara Goode and retired

  • Over the past 20 years of service to our great nation, I have learned many things about our Soldiers, our citizens, and our mission in Iraq.

    Our Soldiers are an all-star team delivering more than is asked on a daily basis.

    American citizens are the most incredible base of support for our men and women in uniform in the history of the world.

    Our mission in Iraq has been more successful than you have been told. So successful that we are ready to embark on a new operation here called “Operation New Dawn.”

  • Aug. 26 was one of my most memorable days. We finally got the opportunity to welcome home our Vietnam veterans after more than 35 years of waiting.

    I remember watching at the age of 15 in 1975 when the news signed off at the American Embassy in Saigon. I had tears rolling down my face watching as our American Soldiers came home and were treated so inhumanely by fellow Americans. Yet I was too young to be able to do anything or be heard.

  • By LT. GEN. RICK LYNCH

    Commander, U.S. Army Installation Management Command

    In the past, energy has been a side conversation for the Army. It tended to be an area of concern for some experts and specialists, but for a lot of us, whether Soldiers and civilians in the workplace or family members in the community, we did not give it much thought.

    Maybe we paid attention to the public service announcements reminding us to turn off lights, but that was about it.

  • By JACEY ECKHART

    CinCHouse.com

    Keep your house in order. Control your wife. Lay down the law. Put her in her place. Put the wench back on a leash off the post. Control your dog or put her down.

  • By LARRY BARNES

    Turret Editor

    larry.barnes2@us.army.mil

    Once upon a time a husband and wife moved into a house which contained a big lovely fireplace.

    The happy couple made the same mistake that many other couples make concerning a big lovely fireplace. Instead of walling it up, they raved about it.

    “I can’t wait until fall arrives and we can have a big log fire,” gushed the wife.

  • By LAURA JOHNSON, Ph.D.

    Chief, Behavioral Health Clinic

    Ireland Army Community Hospital

    The Aug. 19 Turret contained at least four articles that in some way, shape, or form addressed behavioral health topics.

    There was an article on the “Health Promotion, Risk Reduction, and Suicide Prevention Report,” that addressed the recommendations made in the report and suicide signals that the report outlined.

    There was an article about mindfulness as it relates to resiliency, the Global Assessment Tool and how it can build resiliency.

  • Louisville Better Business Bureau

    The Better Business Bureau is warning email users to be cautious when reading their e-mails, after an employee at the BBB received a suspicious message.

    The message states that the email user’s “mailbox has exceeded the storage  limit.” The message the BBB received came from a Brandon W Snyder, with an e-mail address bws3671@esu.edu

    Here is a copy of the email received:

  • Fort Knox ACS Financial Readiness Program

    “A person’s credit report is one of the most important tools consumers can use to maintain their financial security and credit rating… many do not know how to obtain one, or what to do with the information it provides.”

    —Ruben Hinojosa

    Credit affects many fundamental aspects of our lives. Modern society is dependent upon credit to generate sales. It also enables consumers to have the things they want or need, but can’t afford at the present.

  • By CARLLA JONES

    Health Systems Specialist

    U.S. Army Public Health Command (Provisional)

    Why are immunizations so important?

    It’s always better to prevent a disease than to have to treat it later.

    Immunizations were developed to prevent disease in the people who receive them. Immunizations also help protect people who come in contact with others who have not been immunized.